Mac computer screen is blue

You can release the Shift key when the Apple logo disappears and the login screen appears. It may take a few minutes before you get to the login screen as MacOS runs its diagnostics on your hard disk. To leave Safe Mode and start up your Mac per usual, just restart your Mac without holding any keys. If you find yourself staring at a blue screen when you start up your Mac, it might mean that one of your startup items -- apps that start automatically when you start up your Mac -- is incompatible with MacOS. With a bit of trial and error, you can identify which app is the problem child.


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You can remove login items one at a time and start up your Mac after each removal to see if the problem is gone. Next, click the Login Items tab above the window to the right. Highlight an app and then click the "-" sign below. It'll get removed from the Login Items list and you can restart your Mac to see if your startup issue has been fixed.

If not, you can head back to the list and remove another app and keep going until you find the culprit. You might find that an app will occasionally trip up your Mac and hang.


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And when an app hangs, it freezes you out and won't let you do anything, including quit out of it. Enter: Force Quit. Just highlight the app that's not responding and hit the Force Quit button. You can also select multiple apps to force quit by using holding down the Command or Shift keys when making your selections. If you are seeing the spinning beach ball with increasingly regularity, then it's time to take a look at what might be causing the slowdown. Open the Activity Monitor by searching for it or finding it in the Utilities folder, which is inside your Applications folder to see how much of an impact the apps you are currently running have on your system resources.

In the Activity Monitor window, you can see real-time stats on the amount of CPU and memory resources each app is using.

What To Do If a Blank Blue Screen Appears At The Startup in Mac?

You can also use the Activity Monitor to quit any app that's using more than its fair share of resources. Just highlight an app from the list, click the X button in the upper-left corner, and then choose Quit or Force Quit.

Why my Mac stuck on white screen?

If you're still covered by Apple's warranty or AppleCare, the easiest solution is to walk into the Apple Store and have them fix everything for free. If you don't want to waste time or you're not covered anymore, you can do a lot of the troubleshooting yourself. When you turn on your computer and get a grey or blue screen or it gets stuck at the Apple logo that never loads OS X, it's a pretty good cause for concern.

This can happen for a number of reasons, so it's one of the most frustrating things that can happen to a Mac, and troubleshooting it is no easy task. So, let's break it down into a few steps you can take to figure out what's going on. One of the main causes of a grey or blue screen on startup is incompatible hardware connected to the machine.

This might be a printer, an external hard drive, or even a USB hub. So, disconnect everything except the mouse and keyboard, and restart your computer. If your Mac starts this way, then it's an issue with one of those peripherals. You have to trial-and-error your way through to figure out which one, so connect them back into your computer one by one, and restart. If one of them causes your computer to hang on the grey screen again, you've found your issue. If you figure out the problematic peripheral, it's time to do a little research. Head to the manufacturer's web site and see if others are reporting the same problem.

You might be able to fix it with a software update or a firmware update to the device. If no devices are causing problems, and your Mac still won't boot, then it's time to dig a little deeper. Safe boot makes your Mac boot up with the minimum amount of drivers needed to make it work, and it checks your hard disk in the process it might take a bit longer to boot up. Do do this, start up your computer while holding down the Shift key until the Apple logo passes. If your Mac starts up with the safe boot, go ahead and restart the computer again and see if it boots up normally as odd as it sounds this fixes the problem a surprising amount of the time.

If not, it's time to give the hard drive a closer look. If you still can't boot up OS X normally, it's time to run Disk Utility and check out your hard drive:.

How to fix common Mac startup problems [MacRx]

In a lot of cases, running Disk Utility will catch problems with startup issues. Sometimes a single file with the wrong permissions can cause the whole system to collapse, or if something's not in the right place it won't boot. If this doesn't work, you have a lot more problems to look into. If the above solutions don't work, it's time to dig a lot deeper into your system. Your problem could range from a bad hard drive to a faulty logic board.

Here are a few more steps that should help you single out the problem:.

Blue Screen of Death On Mac

Ah yes, the spinning beach ball that refuses to go away. Sometimes it's a small, application-specific problem that's easy to solve, but other times it's part of a much bigger mess. If your Mac is tossing up the spinning beach ball consistently, it's time to figure out the exact cause. Your Mac will usually get a spinning beach ball when it's somehow overloaded.

How to fix a Mac that won't start | TechRadar

More often than not, this just lasts a few seconds and goes away, in which case you can ignore it. If it doesn't, the best way to figure out what's going on is to launch Activity Monitor and pinpoint which program is causing the problem. If it's a powerful piece of software like Photoshop that's causing problems, then it's a good chance you need more RAM in your computer. RAM can help with multi-tasking issues , and if the beach ball comes up when you're running a few programs at once additional RAM will help this is very easy to install yourself.

If not, and it's something lightweight like a file syncing service like Dropbox or an instant messenger client like Adium , then it's probably a problem with the software itself. Try quitting the app and seeing if the problem persists. If the beach ball doesn't return, then you have your problem. When your hard disk is full it can cause spinning beach ball problems. For a lot of us, this just means cleaning up two folders: your trash and your downloads folder:.

In a lot of cases, doing the above two steps can free up enough space to continue working. That said, you might still need to free up even more space. To make this process easy, we like Disk Inventory X. With Disk Inventory X, you can look at your hard drive and find the biggest space hogs quickly so you can delete them and move on. It takes a little time, but if you follow our guide you'll have your hard drive cleared out in no time. Of course, it might also be time to just upgrade the size of your hard drive. A few other oddball things can cause the spinning beach ball.

If none of the above work, here are a few more resources that will help you troubleshoot the problem. If you've ever experienced the black and grey kernel panic screen above, then you know how scary and completely unhelpful it is. When one application has a problem, you get the spinning beach ball mentioned in a previous section, but when multiple programs fail—or the operating system itself—you get a kernel panic.

Thankfully, it's not usually as big of a problem as it seems. In most cases, a kernel panic will force you to reboot you computer. Let this happen, and if you load right back into OS X, continue working on your computer as usual. In a lot of cases, the issue resolves itself and you can move along.